Accelerating Medicines Partnership® Heart Failure

Refining classification for patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction by using deep phenotyping to advance precision therapies.

The Problem
HFpEF - an often deadly form of heart failure - is increasingly prevalent and has only a few effective therapies. It is now more vital than ever to develop precise treatment strategies for this elusive syndrome.
The Solution
AMP HF will alleviate this unmet need by better understanding and classifying HFpEF and find novel proteins or genes that could help with development of treatments.

Overview

The Accelerating Medicines Partnership® Heart Failure Program (AMP® HF) is focused on a major unmet need in cardiovascular health. AMP HF brings together partners from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors to investigate the syndrome of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), which continues to stymie researchers and clinicians. Using cutting-edge technologies, including digital measurements and artificial intelligence analytic methods, AMP HF aims to alter the landscape of heart failure treatment by refining the classification of HFpEF to discovering better, more precise treatment options, thus improving the outlook for millions of patients around the world.

Need for a New Approach

Difficulties in finding suitable therapies for HFpEF have been attributed to the current approach of “bundling” diverse clinical phenotypes under one diagnosis. Increasingly, cardiovascular disease experts are calling for an overhaul of the HFpEF disease definition, to classify the disease based on distinct pathologic and physiologic systems. The development of new phenotyping technologies has significant potential to refine our diagnostic methods and is critical to both this new approach to disease characterization and to the development of new therapies. This requires a coordinated strategy that engages patients, clinicians, researchers, regulators, and industry.

AMP HF will advance our knowledge of HFpEF using two complementary and integrated research components: (1) analyzing existing HFpEF datasets, sourced from public and private sector funded studies, and (2) performing a new clinical study to confirm retrospective findings in an observational cohort, laying the groundwork for development of new precision treatments.

Goals

  • Identify potential subtypes/endotypes of HFpEF for prospective validation, refinement, and extension.
  • Create a cohort and database of HFpEF patients, comparators, and matched controls with baseline and longitudinal follow-up of electronic health record data, clinical data, imaging, biospecimens, and omics.
  • Validate, refine, and extend the “clinically actionable” endotypes of HFpEF identified from the extant datasets.
  • Complete analytic plans to identify novel therapeutic targets.
  • Complete early preparations for a framework and master protocol to test precision therapies for specific endotypes of HFpEF.

Scientific Publications

Accelerating therapeutic discoveries for heart failure: a new public-private partnership – Nature Reviews Drug Discovery

Media

AMP Heart Failure-hd.mp4 from NHLBI on Vimeo.

September 29, 2022, NATURE REVIEWS DRUG DISCOVERY COMMENT – Accelerating therapeutic discoveries for heart failure: a new public-private partnership

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FNIH Contacts

Support

For more information about supporting or becoming a partner in this project, please contact Aimee Ahmed, Director, Strategic Alliances and Advancement, aahmed@fnih.org.

 

ACCELERATING MEDICINES PARTNERSHIP and AMP are registered service marks of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.