To tackle the human health challenges that face the world today, the FNIH develops collaborations with top experts from government, industry, academia and the not-for-profit sector and provides a neutral environment where we can work productively toward a common goal.

Genomic Literacy, Education, and Engagement (GLEE) Initiative

The GLEE initiative will inform and unite K-16 students and educators, public and community-based groups, and healthcare professionals to enhance the integration of genomic information and technologies into healthcare - as well as into society more broadly.

Accelerating Medicines Partnership - Parkinson's Disease

In 2016, the AMP Executive Committee approved the planning of an AMP effort to confront the challenges presented by Parkinson’s disease (PD). This complements current efforts in the areas of Alzheimer’s disease, type 2 diabetes and the autoimmune disorders of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus). A critical component of this partnership is that all members have agreed to make the AMP Parkinson’s disease (AMP PD) data and analyses publicly available to the broad biomedical community.

The Science of Caregiving, Bringing Voices Together

The National Institute of Nursing Research hosted a two-day Summit to gather a variety of stakeholder perspectives on the spectrum of caregiving issues and research for conditions and illnesses that may occur across the lifespan.

International Summit in Human Genetics and Genomics

The International Summit in Human Genetics and Genomics is a five-year initiative (2016-2020) designed to help developing nations build and expand their knowledge base, infrastructure, systems and technologies in genetics and genomics. Each fall, researchers from abroad travel to the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland for one month of in-person training at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). The Summit helps them to understand the prevalence and basis of genetic diseases in their nations and to address these public health challenges. The 2020 Summit will be held on August 31 - October 1, 2020.

Accelerating Medicines Partnership - Alzheimer's Disease

The Accelerating Medicines Partnership Alzheimer’s Disease Project (AMP-AD) is a precompetitive partnership among government, industry, and nonprofit organizations that focuses on discovering novel, clinically relevant therapeutic targets and on developing biomarkers to help validate existing therapeutic targets. 

Human Genome Exhibition

The Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code traveling exhibit is on a nationwide tour at museums and science centers across North America to educate and inform the public about genomic science. The exhibit is a partnership of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History.

Genome Research Fund

The Genome Research Fund supports genetics and genomics research at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI).

Biomarkers Consortium - Workshop: Developing an Evidentiary Criteria Framework for Safety Biomarkers Qualification

This workshop aimed at creating alignment among scientific stakeholders including the FDA, the NIH, the biopharmaceutical industry, academic researchers and patient groups regarding a proposed framework for determining the levels of evidence required to qualify biomarkers for use in drug development.

Biomarkers Consortium - Sarcopenia as a Valid Biomarker for Identifying Individuals at Risk of Disability

Sarcopenia 2 seeks to establish evidence-based cut-points for muscle mass and strength and determine their predictive validity for clinically meaningful outcomes (such as mobility, fractures, hospitalization and death); evaluate relative strength as a discriminator for mobility limitation and incident disability; and explore the potential usefulness of sarcopenia as a clinical endpoint in randomized clinical trials.

Biomarkers Consortium - Establish Guidelines for Initial Diagnostic Criteria for “Sarcopenia with Clinically Important Weakness” and Associated Evidence for Treatment Benefit

The Sarcopenia 1 project launched in 2010 and aimed to establish the first evidence-based definition of sarcopenia (muscle weakness), which is still not recognized as a medical condition.