Programs

To tackle the human health challenges that face the world today, the FNIH develops collaborations with top experts from government, industry, academia and the not-for-profit sector and provides a neutral environment where we can work productively toward a common goal.

Accelerating Medicines Partnership – Schizophrenia

The Accelerating Medicines Partnership–Schizophrenia is the first neuropsychiatric project of the landmark Accelerating Medicines Partnership program managed by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health.

Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED)

The study was implemented using shared and harmonized protocols across the eight sites to gather an enormous amount of data (physical, cognitive assessments, diet, illness and enteric infection, socio-economic status, etc.) to enable identification and characterization of factors associated with negative impacts on a child’s growth, development and vaccine response early in life.

Biomarkers Consortium - The Performance of Novel Cardiac Biomarkers in the General U.S. Population

The Biomarkers Consortium’s Novel Cardiac Biomarkers in the General US Population (the Cardiac Troponin Project) seeks to define the reference ranges and to generate the epidemiologic basis for the use of several significant novel cardiac and related biomarkers for cardiovascular risk stratification in the general U.S. population. The program will measure a panel of biomarkers in almost 30,000 individuals in a national study. The project will provide key reference data regarding novel biomarkers for cardiovascular risk stratification and inform U.S. clinical and laboratory guidelines.

Biomarkers Consortium - Sarcopenia as a Valid Biomarker for Identifying Individuals at Risk of Disability

Sarcopenia 2 seeks to establish evidence-based cut-points for muscle mass and strength and determine their predictive validity for clinically meaningful outcomes (such as mobility, fractures, hospitalization and death); evaluate relative strength as a discriminator for mobility limitation and incident disability; and explore the potential usefulness of sarcopenia as a clinical endpoint in randomized clinical trials.