To tackle the human health challenges that face the world today, the FNIH develops collaborations with top experts from government, industry, academia and the not-for-profit sector and provides a neutral environment where we can work productively toward a common goal.

2018 Alzheimer’s Disease Research Summit

National Institutes of Health convened the 3rd Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) Research Summit on March 1-2, 2018 in Bethesda, Maryland. The program built on the foundation laid by the 2012 and 2015 NIH AD Research Summits and the U.S. National Alzheimer’s Project Act (NAPA)/National Plan to Address AD.

National Research Summit on Dementia Care: Building Evidence for Services and Supports

On October 16-17, 2017, the National Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care and Services held a two-day Summit on the NIH campus entitled: National Research Summit on Dementia Care: Building Evidence for Services and Supports. The purpose of the Summit was to address the growing need for evidence that improves the quality of care and support provided to persons with dementia and their caregivers.

Cognitive Aging Summit III

Held in 2017, the Cognitive Aging Summit III will brought together experts in a variety of research fields to discuss the most cutting edge advances in our understanding of age-related brain and cognitive changes, with a particular focus on resilience and reserve.

2016 Alzheimer's Disease-Related Dementias (ADRD) Summit

The 2016 Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Dementias (ADRD) Summit was hosted by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) in collaboration with the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and held March 29-30, 2016 at the Natcher Auditorium on the NIH Campus.

Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 2

ADNI was established to facilitate the development of effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease by validating biomarkers for clinical trials and determining the relationships between the clinical, cognitive, imaging, genetic, and biochemical biomarker characteristics of AD.  

Biomarkers Consortium - Use of Targeted Multiplex Proteomic Strategies to Identify Plasma-Based Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease

The Biomarkers Consortium’s Targeted Plasma-Based Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), completed in July 2012, was the first part of a multi-phased effort utilizing samples from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to validate multiplex panels in both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), to diagnose patients with AD and to monitor disease progression.

Biomarkers Consortium - Use of Targeted Multiplex Proteomic Strategies to Identify CSF-Based Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease

The AD Targeted Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Proteomics Project, completed in Q2Y15, completed an initial validation of a multiplexed panel of known biomarkers, examined BACE levels and enzymatic activity, and set up the initial validation of a mass spectroscopy panel using AD cerebrospinal fluid samples from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI).

Biomarkers Consortium - Sarcopenia as a Valid Biomarker for Identifying Individuals at Risk of Disability

Sarcopenia 2 seeks to establish evidence-based cut-points for muscle mass and strength and determine their predictive validity for clinically meaningful outcomes (such as mobility, fractures, hospitalization and death); evaluate relative strength as a discriminator for mobility limitation and incident disability; and explore the potential usefulness of sarcopenia as a clinical endpoint in randomized clinical trials.

Biomarkers Consortium - Establish Guidelines for Initial Diagnostic Criteria for “Sarcopenia with Clinically Important Weakness” and Associated Evidence for Treatment Benefit

The Sarcopenia 1 project launched in 2010 and aimed to establish the first evidence-based definition of sarcopenia (muscle weakness), which is still not recognized as a medical condition.

Biomarkers Consortium - Comparison of Two PET Radioligands to Quantify the Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptor

The Biomarkers Consortium’s PET Radioligand Project, completed in December 2012, developed improved, more sensitive PET radioligands with higher binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor. Findings from this study suggest that the [11C]PBR38 ligand, in particular, may be useful in detecting progression from mild cognitive impairment or treatment response in Alzheimer’s Disease.