To tackle the human health challenges that face the world today, the FNIH develops collaborations with top experts from government, industry, academia and the not-for-profit sector and provides a neutral environment where we can work productively toward a common goal.

CarMollNat Muscular Dystrophy Endowment
Accelerating Medicines Partnership - Parkinson's Disease

In 2016, the AMP Executive Committee approved the planning of an AMP effort to confront the challenges presented by Parkinson’s disease (PD). This complements current efforts in the areas of Alzheimer’s disease, type 2 diabetes and the autoimmune disorders of rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus). A critical component of this partnership is that all members have agreed to make the AMP Parkinson’s disease (AMP PD) data and analyses publicly available to the broad biomedical community.

Accelerating Medicines Partnership - Alzheimer's Disease

The Accelerating Medicines Partnership Alzheimer’s Disease Project (AMP-AD) is a precompetitive partnership among government, industry, and nonprofit organizations that focuses on discovering novel, clinically relevant therapeutic targets and on developing biomarkers to help validate existing therapeutic targets. 

Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 3 (ADNI 3)

The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), is a landmark study that has profoundly influenced our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease by identifying the earliest changes in brain structure and function that signal its onset and progression.

Non-Invasive Biomarkers of Metabolic Liver Disease (NIMBLE)

The NIMBLE Project is a comprehensive, five-year collaborative effort to standardize, compare and appropriately validate imaging and circulating biomarkers for NASH to: 1. Diagnose and stage the disease and; 2. Measure response to therapeutic intervention.

Biomarkers Consortium - Workshop: Defining an Evidentiary Criteria Framework for Surrogate Endpoint Qualification

The FNIH Biomarkers Consortium and FDA hosted a workshop to provide a Framework for Defining the Evidentiary Criteria for Surrogate Endpoint Qualification on July 30-31, 2018. The workshop aimed to create alignment of the biomedical community and regulators on the levels of evidence required to qualify biomarkers for use in drug development, with an emphasis on surrogate endpoints and specific clinical outcome measures.

Biomarkers Consortium - Inflammatory Markers for Early Detection and Subtyping of Neurodegenerative and Mood Disorders

This project will aim to standardize and validate measurement methods for inflammatory markers associated with Alzheimer’s Disease and/or Major Depressive Disorder to ultimately identify a unique biosignature of disease. The identified biosignature would greatly assist with medication development, patient diagnosing, and patient selection for clinical trials.

Biomarkers Consortium - Use of Targeted Multiplex Proteomic Strategies to Identify Plasma-Based Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease

The Biomarkers Consortium’s Targeted Plasma-Based Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), completed in July 2012, was the first part of a multi-phased effort utilizing samples from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to validate multiplex panels in both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), to diagnose patients with AD and to monitor disease progression.

Biomarkers Consortium - Bone Quality Project

The Biomarkers Consortium’s Bone Quality Project aims to evaluate and to identify biomarkers of bone strength and quality changes by analyzing pooled imaging and biochemical data from multiple clinical studies to allow definition of better clinical endpoints.

Biomarkers Consortium - Placebo Data Analysis Project in Alzheimer’s Disease/Mild Cognitive Impairment Clinical Trials

The Biomarkers Consortium’s Placebo Data Analysis Project in Alzheimer’s Disease/Mild Cognitive Impairment Clinical Trials combined placebo data from large clinical trials provided by multiple pharmaceutical companies to create datasets of 3,000 to 5,000 subjects for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) groups. The goal of the project was to develop better measures of disease progression in terms of outcome measures that have both low variability and are sensitive to change, for use in future clinical trials.