Programs

To tackle the human health challenges that face the world today, the FNIH develops collaborations with top experts from government, industry, academia and the not-for-profit sector and provides a neutral environment where we can work productively toward a common goal.

11th International Forum on Rheumatoid Arthritis (IFRA)

The 11th International Forum on Rheumatoid Arthritis: Pathogenesis and Emerging Therapeutic Strategies (IFRA 2019) is designed to bring together leading rheumatologists from Europe, the United States and Asian countries working to better understand the pathogenesis and emerging therapeutic strategies in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Dr. Edward T. Rancic Memorial Fund for Cancer Research

The Dr. Edward T. Rancic Memorial Fund for Cancer Research supports a Fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Richard Childs at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) to explore treatments for renal cell carcinoma.

Dean R. O'Neill Renal Cell Cancer Research Fund

The Dean R. O'Neill Renal Cell Cancer Research Fund supports a Fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Richard Childs at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) to explore treatments for renal cell carcinoma.

Accelerating Medicines Partnership: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus & Related Autoimmune Disorders

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus & Related Autoimmune Disorders is an initiative of the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP), which is a multi-sector, pre-competitive  partnership among government, industry, and nonprofit organizations, the goal of which is to harness collective capabilities, scale and resources toward improving current efforts to develop new therapies for complex, heterogeneous diseases.

Non-Invasive Biomarkers of Metabolic Liver Disease (NIMBLE)

The NIMBLE Project is a comprehensive, five-year collaborative effort to standardize, compare and appropriately validate imaging and circulating biomarkers for NASH to: 1. Diagnose and stage the disease and; 2. Measure response to therapeutic intervention.

Biomarkers Consortium - Workshop: Defining an Evidentiary Criteria Framework for Surrogate Endpoint Qualification

The FNIH Biomarkers Consortium and FDA hosted a workshop to provide a Framework for Defining the Evidentiary Criteria for Surrogate Endpoint Qualification on July 30-31, 2018. The workshop aimed to create alignment of the biomedical community and regulators on the levels of evidence required to qualify biomarkers for use in drug development, with an emphasis on surrogate endpoints and specific clinical outcome measures.

Biomarkers Consortium - Inflammatory Markers for Early Detection and Subtyping of Neurodegenerative and Mood Disorders

This project will aim to standardize and validate measurement methods for inflammatory markers associated with Alzheimer’s Disease and/or Major Depressive Disorder to ultimately identify a unique biosignature of disease. The identified biosignature would greatly assist with medication development, patient diagnosing, and patient selection for clinical trials.

Biomarkers Consortium - Workshop: Developing an Evidentiary Criteria Framework for Safety Biomarkers Qualification

This workshop aimed at creating alignment among scientific stakeholders including the FDA, the NIH, the biopharmaceutical industry, academic researchers and patient groups regarding a proposed framework for determining the levels of evidence required to qualify biomarkers for use in drug development.

Biomarkers Consortium - Treatments Against RA and Effect on FDG PET-CT (TARGET Biomarker Study)

The Biomarkers Consortium’s TARGET Biomarker Study seeks to utilize validated proteomic biomarkers of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity and inflammation to categorize baseline and disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)-associated changes in vascular inflammation in RA patients.

Biomarkers Consortium - Sarcopenia as a Valid Biomarker for Identifying Individuals at Risk of Disability

Sarcopenia 2 seeks to establish evidence-based cut-points for muscle mass and strength and determine their predictive validity for clinically meaningful outcomes (such as mobility, fractures, hospitalization and death); evaluate relative strength as a discriminator for mobility limitation and incident disability; and explore the potential usefulness of sarcopenia as a clinical endpoint in randomized clinical trials.