To tackle the human health challenges that face the world today, the FNIH develops collaborations with top experts from government, industry, academia and the not-for-profit sector and provides a neutral environment where we can work productively toward a common goal.

Amgen-NIH Scholars Program

In 2015, the NIH became one of 17 leading institutions taking part in the Amgen Scholars Program, a training program that enables undergraduates to participate in cutting-edge research opportunities at world-class institutions.

Human Genome Exhibition

The Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code traveling exhibit is on a nationwide tour at museums and science centers across North America to educate and inform the public about genomic science. The exhibit is a partnership of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History.

Sports and Health Research Program

The Sports and Health Research Program (SHRP) sought to help accelerate research that enhances the health of athletes at all ages and levels, and to extend the research’s impact beyond the playing field to benefit others in the general population, including members of the military.

Genome Research Fund

The Genome Research Fund supports genetics and genomics research at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI).

Biomarkers Consortium - Workshop: Defining an Evidentiary Criteria Framework for Surrogate Endpoint Qualification

The FNIH Biomarkers Consortium and FDA hosted a workshop to provide a Framework for Defining the Evidentiary Criteria for Surrogate Endpoint Qualification on July 30-31, 2018. The workshop aimed to create alignment of the biomedical community and regulators on the levels of evidence required to qualify biomarkers for use in drug development, with an emphasis on surrogate endpoints and specific clinical outcome measures.

Biomarkers Consortium - The Performance of Novel Cardiac Biomarkers in the General U.S. Population

The Biomarkers Consortium’s Novel Cardiac Biomarkers in the General US Population (the Cardiac Troponin Project) seeks to define the reference ranges and to generate the epidemiologic basis for the use of several significant novel cardiac and related biomarkers for cardiovascular risk stratification in the general U.S. population. The program will measure a panel of biomarkers in almost 30,000 individuals in a national study. The project will provide key reference data regarding novel biomarkers for cardiovascular risk stratification and inform U.S. clinical and laboratory guidelines.