Programs

To tackle the human health challenges that face the world today, the FNIH develops collaborations with top experts from government, industry, academia and the not-for-profit sector and provides a neutral environment where we can work productively toward a common goal.

Clayton-Dedonder Mentorship Fellows Program

Clayton-Dedonder Mentorship Fellows Program is designed to enhance the teaching and leadership skills of entry- to mid-level faculty at universities and research institutions in low- and middle-income countries at select training sites funded by the NIH Fogarty International Center.

Amgen-NIH Scholars Program

In 2015, the NIH became one of 17 leading institutions taking part in the Amgen Scholars Program, a training program that enables undergraduates to participate in cutting-edge research opportunities at world-class institutions.

Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED)

The study was implemented using shared and harmonized protocols across the eight sites to gather an enormous amount of data (physical, cognitive assessments, diet, illness and enteric infection, socio-economic status, etc.) to enable identification and characterization of factors associated with negative impacts on a child’s growth, development and vaccine response early in life.

Osteoarthritis Initiative

The Osteoarthritis Initiative was a public-private collaboration to improve the efficiency of drug development and clinical trials for the treatment of osteoarthritis, which affects more than 30 million adults in the United States.

Sports and Health Research Program

The Sports and Health Research Program (SHRP) seeks to help accelerate research that enhances the health of athletes at all ages and levels, and to extend the research’s impact beyond the playing field to benefit others in the general population, including members of the military.

Biomarkers Consortium - Workshop: Defining an Evidentiary Criteria Framework for Surrogate Endpoint Qualification

The FNIH Biomarkers Consortium and FDA hosted a workshop to provide a Framework for Defining the Evidentiary Criteria for Surrogate Endpoint Qualification on July 30-31, 2018. The workshop aimed to create alignment of the biomedical community and regulators on the levels of evidence required to qualify biomarkers for use in drug development, with an emphasis on surrogate endpoints and specific clinical outcome measures.

Biomarkers Consortium - Inflammatory Markers for Early Detection and Subtyping of Neurodegenerative and Mood Disorders

This project will aim to standardize and validate measurement methods for inflammatory markers associated with Alzheimer’s Disease and/or Major Depressive Disorder to ultimately identify a unique biosignature of disease. The identified biosignature would greatly assist with medication development, patient diagnosing, and patient selection for clinical trials.

Biomarkers Consortium - Workshop: Developing an Evidentiary Criteria Framework for Safety Biomarkers Qualification

This workshop aimed at creating alignment among scientific stakeholders including the FDA, the NIH, the biopharmaceutical industry, academic researchers and patient groups regarding a proposed framework for determining the levels of evidence required to qualify biomarkers for use in drug development.

Biomarkers Consortium - Use of Targeted Multiplex Proteomic Strategies to Identify CSF-Based Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Disease

The AD Targeted Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) Proteomics Project, completed in Q2Y15, completed an initial validation of a multiplexed panel of known biomarkers, examined BACE levels and enzymatic activity, and set up the initial validation of a mass spectroscopy panel using AD cerebrospinal fluid samples from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI).

Biomarkers Consortium - Sarcopenia as a Valid Biomarker for Identifying Individuals at Risk of Disability

Sarcopenia 2 seeks to establish evidence-based cut-points for muscle mass and strength and determine their predictive validity for clinically meaningful outcomes (such as mobility, fractures, hospitalization and death); evaluate relative strength as a discriminator for mobility limitation and incident disability; and explore the potential usefulness of sarcopenia as a clinical endpoint in randomized clinical trials.