To tackle the human health challenges that face the world today, the FNIH develops collaborations with top experts from government, industry, academia and the not-for-profit sector and provides a neutral environment where we can work productively toward a common goal.

Biomarkers Consortium - Neuroscience Symposium

The Neuroscience Steering Committee, led by the FNIH and its co-chairs Dr. Linda Brady, Dr. Hartmuth Kolb, and the emeritus co-chair Dr. Bill Potter, is bringing together experts in the field of neuroscience from industry, NIH, FDA, and academia to present progress to date, next steps, and key obstacles that need to be addressed in order to drive biomarker development in a multitude of neuroscience focus areas. 

Biomarkers Consortium - Carotid MRI Development and Validation via an AIMHIGH Sub-Study

The goal of this project was to conduct a 75-patient study at a total of 15 centers to determine the reproducibility of the non-invasive technique of carotid magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). Results established a standardized carotid MRI protocol and determined, for the first time, that kinetic parameters of carotid atherosclerotic plaque are reproducible and can be used for multi-center studies.

Biomarkers Consortium - In Silico Modeling of Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis: Estimating Risk Reduction and Residual Risk from Statin Therapy

The Biomarkers Consortium’s In Silico Modeling of Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis: Estimating Risk Reduction and Residual Risk From Statin Therapy’s goal was to identify a time-dependent, dynamically-responsive panel of extant markers that change in response to Phase II intervention and predict Phase III clinical cardiovascular outcomes to build the model. This model would support cardiovascular drug development decision-making and assessment of atherosclerotic risk in the development of drugs for other indications.

Biomarkers Consortium - The Autism Biomarkers Consortium for Clinical Trials (ABC-CT)

The Consortium will establish a technical and data infrastructure for reliably measuring social function, allowing the collaborating sites to work together as a single unit. The goal is to create a set of measures that can be used in clinical trials to determine which treatments are best for which patients and who will benefit from a particular treatment. The ultimate goal is to further develop and validate a set of measures that can be used as stratification biomarkers and/or sensitive and reliable objective measures of social impairment in autism spectrum disorders that could serve as indicative markers of long term clinical outcome.