To tackle the human health challenges that face the world today, the FNIH develops collaborations with top experts from government, industry, academia and the not-for-profit sector and provides a neutral environment where we can work productively toward a common goal.

Bespoke Gene Therapy Consortium (BGTC)

The Bespoke Gene Therapy Consortium (BGTC) is a developing public-private partnership dedicated to making gene therapy a reality for people with rare genetic diseases affecting populations too small to be viable from the current commercial perspective. Building on the successful Accelerating Medicines Partnership model, this program will focus on developing an operational playbook that invokes the use of streamlined templates, master regulatory files, and uniform production processes. It is anticipated that following a pilot phase of 4-6 test cases, a pathway toward the commercial viability of these therapies will be found. This may ultimately have a tremendously positive impact on the larger field of gene therapy if it moves more broadly into the era of genome editing.

Accelerating Medicines Partnership – Schizophrenia

The Accelerating Medicines Partnership–Schizophrenia is the first neuropsychiatric project of the landmark Accelerating Medicines Partnership program managed by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health.

Understanding the Mechanisms of Intravenous BCG-Induced Protection Against TB in NHP (TB Vaccine)

Two billion people worldwide are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) resulting in 10 million cases of clinical disease and 1.5 million deaths each year. The hurdles for developing a highly protective and durable vaccine against Mtb require addressing four central tenets of T cell immunology – magnitude, quality, breadth, and location of the response. These specific elements of the problem will be addressed by focusing on how altering the route of vaccination using a whole attenuated organism vaccine substantially increases immune responses and protection in a rigorous non-human primate model of Mtb infection.

The Biomedical Research Community Responds to the Opioids Crisis

As part of a larger national effort to address the opioid crisis, the FNIH is leading the planning effort for a potential public-private scientific partnership that includes the NIH, FDA, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) and more than 30 biopharmaceutical companies.

Comprehensive Cellular Vaccine Immune Monitoring Consortium

A collaborative program that provides standardized and research level assays for clinical and pre-clinical HIV vaccine trials.

SHORTEN-TB

SHORTEN-TB will build on lessons learned from the HIT-TB program to identify leads that have the greatest potential to comprise drug regimens that will significantly reduce the duration of chemotherapy for tuberculosis.

PredictTB

PredictTB is a five-year clinical trial project that aims to shorten the treatment times of tuberculosis (TB) in drug-sensitive patients through individualized therapy.

Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP)

The goal of the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP) is to bring together the resources of NIH and industry to improve our understanding of disease pathways and facilitate better selection of targets for treatment.

Global Health Fund

The Global Health Fund supports FNIH programs that are designed to alleviate widespread suffering in the developing world. Program focus includes research and training on diseases such as malaria and HIV, as well as conditions like malnutrition that afflict hundreds of millions of people globally.

Accelerating Medicines Partnership: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus & Related Autoimmune Disorders

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus & Related Autoimmune Disorders is an initiative of the Accelerating Medicines Partnership (AMP), which is a multi-sector, pre-competitive  partnership among government, industry, and nonprofit organizations, the goal of which is to harness collective capabilities, scale and resources toward improving current efforts to develop new therapies for complex, heterogeneous diseases.