To tackle the human health challenges that face the world today, the FNIH develops collaborations with top experts from government, industry, academia and the not-for-profit sector and provides a neutral environment where we can work productively toward a common goal.

Genomic Literacy, Education, and Engagement (GLEE) Initiative

The GLEE initiative will inform and unite K-16 students and educators, public and community-based groups, and healthcare professionals to enhance the integration of genomic information and technologies into healthcare - as well as into society more broadly.

Principles of Pharmacology Course

The Principles of Clinical Pharmacology Course at the NIH Clinical Center trains scholars and researchers in the clinical pharmacologic aspects of contemporary drug development and utilization. Since 1998, more than 10,000 individuals have taken the lecture-based course. The FNIH supported this program from 2009-2015.

Osteoarthritis Initiative

The Osteoarthritis Initiative was a public-private collaboration to improve the efficiency of drug development and clinical trials for the treatment of osteoarthritis, which affects more than 30 million adults in the United States.

Development & Production of Endotoxin under GMP for Human Clinical Research

Development & Production of Endotoxin under GMP for Human Clinical Research is a program enabling NIH to develop and produce a new strain of endotoxin under good manufacturing practices (GMP) conditions.

Biomarkers Consortium - Establish Guidelines for Initial Diagnostic Criteria for “Sarcopenia with Clinically Important Weakness” and Associated Evidence for Treatment Benefit

The Sarcopenia 1 project launched in 2010 and aimed to establish the first evidence-based definition of sarcopenia (muscle weakness), which is still not recognized as a medical condition.

Biomarkers Consortium - Osteoarthritis Biomarkers Project

The Biomarkers Consortium - Osteoarthritis Biomarkers Project is a $3.4 million study aimed at determining which biomarkers have greater prognostic ability to measure early progression of structural and symptomatic changes in the joint over time and which are likely to predict treatment response better than the radiographic measurement of narrowing of joint space in knee OA patients. These new biomarkers are candidates for follow-on studies for evaluation and use in regulatory decision-making.