To tackle the human health challenges that face the world today, the FNIH develops collaborations with top experts from government, industry, academia and the not-for-profit sector and provides a neutral environment where we can work productively toward a common goal.

Bespoke Gene Therapy Consortium (BGTC)

The Bespoke Gene Therapy Consortium (BGTC) is a developing public-private partnership dedicated to making gene therapy a reality for people with rare genetic diseases affecting populations too small to be viable from the current commercial perspective. Building on the successful Accelerating Medicines Partnership model, this program will focus on developing an operational playbook that invokes the use of streamlined templates, master regulatory files, and uniform production processes. It is anticipated that following a pilot phase of 4-6 test cases, a pathway toward the commercial viability of these therapies will be found. This may ultimately have a tremendously positive impact on the larger field of gene therapy if it moves more broadly into the era of genome editing.

Genomic Literacy, Education, and Engagement (GLEE) Initiative

The GLEE initiative will inform and unite K-16 students and educators, public and community-based groups, and healthcare professionals to enhance the integration of genomic information and technologies into healthcare - as well as into society more broadly.

International Summit in Human Genetics and Genomics

The International Summit in Human Genetics and Genomics is a five-year initiative (2016-2020) designed to help developing nations build and expand their knowledge base, infrastructure, systems and technologies in genetics and genomics. Each fall, researchers from abroad travel to the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland for one month of in-person training at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). The Summit helps them to understand the prevalence and basis of genetic diseases in their nations and to address these public health challenges. The 2020 Summit will be held on August 31 - October 1, 2020.

Baby Connectome Project

The Baby Connectome Project (BCP) is a four-year study of children from birth through five years of age, intended to provide a better understanding of how the brain develops from infancy through early childhood and the factors that contribute to healthy brain development.

Human Genome Exhibition

The Genome: Unlocking Life’s Code traveling exhibit is on a nationwide tour at museums and science centers across North America to educate and inform the public about genomic science. The exhibit is a partnership of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History.

Genome Research Fund

The Genome Research Fund supports genetics and genomics research at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI).

Biomarkers Consortium - Inflammatory Markers for Early Detection and Subtyping of Neurodegenerative and Mood Disorders

This project will aim to standardize and validate measurement methods for inflammatory markers associated with Alzheimer’s Disease and/or Major Depressive Disorder to ultimately identify a unique biosignature of disease. The identified biosignature would greatly assist with medication development, patient diagnosing, and patient selection for clinical trials.

Biomarkers Consortium - Workshop: Developing an Evidentiary Criteria Framework for Safety Biomarkers Qualification

This workshop aimed at creating alignment among scientific stakeholders including the FDA, the NIH, the biopharmaceutical industry, academic researchers and patient groups regarding a proposed framework for determining the levels of evidence required to qualify biomarkers for use in drug development.

Biomarkers Consortium - The Performance of Novel Cardiac Biomarkers in the General U.S. Population

The Biomarkers Consortium’s Novel Cardiac Biomarkers in the General US Population (the Cardiac Troponin Project) seeks to define the reference ranges and to generate the epidemiologic basis for the use of several significant novel cardiac and related biomarkers for cardiovascular risk stratification in the general U.S. population. The program will measure a panel of biomarkers in almost 30,000 individuals in a national study. The project will provide key reference data regarding novel biomarkers for cardiovascular risk stratification and inform U.S. clinical and laboratory guidelines.

Biomarkers Consortium - Sarcopenia as a Valid Biomarker for Identifying Individuals at Risk of Disability

Sarcopenia 2 seeks to establish evidence-based cut-points for muscle mass and strength and determine their predictive validity for clinically meaningful outcomes (such as mobility, fractures, hospitalization and death); evaluate relative strength as a discriminator for mobility limitation and incident disability; and explore the potential usefulness of sarcopenia as a clinical endpoint in randomized clinical trials.