To tackle the human health challenges that face the world today, the FNIH develops collaborations with top experts from government, industry, academia and the not-for-profit sector and provides a neutral environment where we can work productively toward a common goal.

Bespoke Gene Therapy Consortium (BGTC)

The Bespoke Gene Therapy Consortium (BTGC) represents a public-private partnership dedicated to making gene therapy a reality for people with rare genetic diseases affecting populations too small to be viable from the current commercial perspective. By developing a operational playbook that invokes the use of streamlined templates, master regulatory files, and uniform production processes, it is anticipated that following a pilot phase, a pathway toward the commercial viability of these therapies will be found. This may ultimately have a tremendously positive impact on the larger field of gene therapy it moves more broadly into the era of genome editing.

The Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health Trial (MACH15)

The Moderate Alcohol and Cardiovascular Health Trial (MACH15) was a longitudinal, international clinical trial to determine the effects of moderate alcohol use on cardiovascular disease and diabetes. 

The Science of Caregiving, Bringing Voices Together

The National Institute of Nursing Research hosted a two-day Summit to gather a variety of stakeholder perspectives on the spectrum of caregiving issues and research for conditions and illnesses that may occur across the lifespan.

Plasticity and Mechanisms of Cognitive Remediation in Older Adults

Plasticity and Mechanisms of Cognitive Remediation in Older Adults supports a grant for a multicenter clinical research trial on remediating age-related cognitive decline through mindfulness-based stress reduction and exercise.

Stephen E. Straus Distinguished Lecture

The Stephen E. Straus Distinguished Lecture in the Science of Complementary Health Therapies is an annual lecture given by leading figures in science and medicine who come to NIH to speak from their perspective about the field of complementary and integrative medicine.

Baby Connectome Project

The Baby Connectome Project (BCP) is a four-year study of children from birth through five years of age, intended to provide a better understanding of how the brain develops from infancy through early childhood and the factors that contribute to healthy brain development.

Biomarkers Consortium - Inflammatory Markers for Early Detection and Subtyping of Neurodegenerative and Mood Disorders

This project will aim to standardize and validate measurement methods for inflammatory markers associated with Alzheimer’s Disease and/or Major Depressive Disorder to ultimately identify a unique biosignature of disease. The identified biosignature would greatly assist with medication development, patient diagnosing, and patient selection for clinical trials.

Biomarkers Consortium - Workshop: Developing an Evidentiary Criteria Framework for Safety Biomarkers Qualification

This workshop aimed at creating alignment among scientific stakeholders including the FDA, the NIH, the biopharmaceutical industry, academic researchers and patient groups regarding a proposed framework for determining the levels of evidence required to qualify biomarkers for use in drug development.

Biomarkers Consortium - Comparison of Two PET Radioligands to Quantify the Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptor

whorton@fnih.orgThe Biomarkers Consortium’s PET Radioligand Project, completed in December 2012, developed improved, more sensitive PET radioligands with higher binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor. Findings from this study suggest that the [11C]PBR38 ligand, in particular, may be useful in detecting progression from mild cognitive impairment or treatment response in Alzheimer’s Disease.

Biomarkers Consortium - Evaluation of the Utility of Adiponectin as a Biomarker for Predicting Glycemic Efficacy

The primary objective of this project was to determine whether a 30kDa adipocyte-secreted protein, adiponectin, has utility as predictive serum biomarker of glycemic control in normal non-diabetic subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes, following treatment with a novel and promising new class of compounds, PPARγ agonists. Results confirmed previous relationships between adiponectin levels and metabolic parameters, and support the robust and predictive utility of adiponectin across the spectrum of glucose tolerance.